The Safety of the Lighthouse


lighthouses-vs-waves

“Anxiously you ask, ‘Is there a way to safety? Can someone guide me? Is there an escape from threatened destruction?’ The answer is a resounding yes! I counsel you: Look to the lighthouse of the Lord. There is no fog so dense, no night so dark, no gale so strong, no mariner so lost but what its beacon light can rescue. It beckons through the storms of life. It calls, ‘This way to safety; this way to home.”

– Thomas S. Monson

LIGHTHOUSES


lighthouse

Navigating by the stars was how sailors found their way in ancient times. But what happened when it was dark and clouds blocked the stars? After many a shipwreck, lighthouses were built along coastlines to aid seamen in guiding them to their destinations.

2 Corinthians 4:6

For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” made his light shine in our hearts to give us the light of the knowledge of God’s glory displayed in the face of Christ.

The most famous and enduring light house is perhaps the lighthouse of Alexandria, Egypt. It stood in the Island of Pharos, in the Harbor of Alexandria, Egypt. It was finished around 280 BC, meaning it was standing at the time Christ was on earth. It was approximately 350 feet tall. This lighthouse lit up the harbor of Alexandria for 15 centuries, until it was destroyed by an earthquake in 1303 AD. Think about how many were saved by that single lighthouse over the centuries. How many more can be saved by the love and sacrifice of our Lord and Savior? Lighthouses are representative of the Christian faith for many reasons. Lighthouses represent God’s: Strength Lighthouses represent strength as they are able to withstand the elements of nature.

Philippians 4:13

I can do all this through him who gives me strength 

Joshua 1:9

Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.” 

Hope Lighthouses represent hope; hope that we will soon reach safety. With God there is always Hope. 

Psalm 33:20

We wait in hope for the Lord; he is our help and our shield. 

Proverbs 23:18

There is surely a future hope for you, and your hope will not be cut off. 

Endurance Lighthouses withstand the extreme elements of nature. God will stand firm against every adversity we face. 

Psalm 100:5

For the Lord is good and his love endures forever; his faithfulness continues through all generations. 

Guidance The light from light houses guides sailors home just as the light of Christ guides people to their salvation. 

John 14:16

And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another advocate to help you and be with you forever— 

James 1:5

If any of you lacks wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you. 

Proverbs 3:5-6

Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding;  in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.

Proverbs 1:5

Let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance— 

Love Those light houses would not have been put along the rugged coast lines if someone didn’t care about the safety of those sailors. God’s love is infinitely greater than man’s love for each other.

Romans 8:38-39

For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Sharing We are lighthouses. We are to share the light and be a beacon of hope in this dark world. We’re commanded to do this by the Great Commission, found in two gospels:

Matthew 28:19

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 

Mark 16:15

He said to them, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation.

Isaiah 6:8

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?”

And I said, “Here am I. Send me!”

Go Be A Light!

Scripture is from www.BibleGateway.com Image is from google images Note:  if ads are appearing anywhere on this page it is because they are placed there by WordPress, not by me.  I have read the information on ads and in order to be ad free now, WordPress charges a fee.  I apologize for any inconvenience these ads may cause you, and if they are inappropriate please message me. Thank you.

 

A TALE OF TWO LIGHTHOUSES


lighthouse 2

Many years ago there was a little village on a rocky seacoast, where storms often battered and seas were ever treacherous. Many ships were driven onto the rocks by the storms, and the lives of many sailors were lost because of the raging seas.

One day the people decided among themselves that they should establish a lighthouse and life-saving station on a little peninsula on the coast, to warn ships away from the rocks and to save the lives of those who were cast into the icy waters. They approached the government and began to secure the necessary funds for their project. Soon they set forth and built a tower, and set a beacon in it; they organized a lookout system; and they bought boats and learned how to man them; and soon they were in business. The business of saving lives!

Soon the effects of what they were doing became known far and wide. Fewer ships went on the rocks; and when such a tragedy did occur, and the alarm was sounded, the people risked their own lives to rescue those who had been cast into the raging, icy waters. Within a few short years, people came from great distance to study their lighthouse, and to use it as a model.

One day someone suggested that, since they all spent so much time at the lighthouse that they should gather there occasionally and enjoy good fellowship. And soon they began to get together (at first infrequently, and then more often) at the lighthouse. In fact, many people began to build their homes near the lighthouse. Then when the lookout sounded the alarm, they were there, ready to go out.

Next, it was decided that if they were going to spend so much time there, they must make the place more comfortable. So arrangements were made to heat the lighthouse. The gray walls were painted a brilliant white. Some of the walls were paneled; rugs were put on the floors to disguise the bare concrete; a fine kitchen was installed with a handsome stove; and generally speaking the lighthouse became a nice place to spend your time waiting for the alarm to be sounded. Everything about the lighthouse was made comfortable and nice. The lighthouse soon became the center of life in the little town that grew up around it.

One night a fierce storm blew in, as storms had blown in for years. Many ships were tossed on the jagged rocks, and the men at the lighthouse spent long hours picking sailors from the bitter cold icy waters and taking them to the lighthouse, where they were fed and provided with dry clothing. This had happened many times over the years, but this time, after the storm subsided and the sailors had all left the lighthouse, there were some men who were angry. It seems the storm had made them leave the comfort of the lighthouse, and go out into the wet, dangerous seas; and they got cold; very cold. The sailors, when they were delivered to the lighthouse, soiled the carpets. The kitchen was a mess, not to mention the stove. After a brief meeting it was first decided that sailors, when they were brought to the lighthouse, should be taken to the basement, not to the nice upper areas.

Some time later, another storm blew in; and about one half of the men went out in the boats, and again picked sailors from the frigid waters. This time the ship, which had broken apart on the rocks, was from another nation; and the men who manned her spoke another language, and even worse were of a different color. After this storm, a few more men joined those who refused to enter the sea. They decided that men like these did not belong in the lighthouse at all; some said they felt that the lighthouses’ job was not supposed to be saving sailors from other lands, because they were so much different. There were those, too, who objected to leaving the comfort of the lighthouse to go out into the storm. These men petitioned the government and they also agreed. So, finally, it was decided that the beacon would be kept lit, but the rescue work would be discontinued.

A small group disagreed, however, and went down the coast, a short distance, and started a new lighthouse. This small group decided that they should establish the biggest life-saving station on the little peninsula, and so they did. Every day they warned ships and sometimes attempted to save lives from the icy water. Fame of the new lighthouse grew and the lighthouse back up the bay eventually turned out its beacon. Some people say the beacon can still be seen today in you and I. Oh yes, they also say the small group running the new lighthouse were those once rescued from the raging seas.

We as people all have a choice to make with regards to our rescue work. We can choose to allow our lives to become comfortable and we can find ourselves very content. And often times we may find that we have turned out our beacon of hope for one another. Or perhaps, I hope and pray that we find ourselves lighting and saving the path of others both in our words and deeds.

-Ernest W. Corty