Prayer Challenge for July


pray for America

The Great American Experiment was founded by people with Christian ideals (The Heritage Foundation). Those ideals influenced the creation of our nation and founding documents. Our prosperity is evidence that God has greatly blessed America. We are often the envy of other nations. However, our world is constantly changing and the state of our country is often discouraging. Natural disasters, violence, and disobedience are on the increase. Those in authority often violate God’s Word, even mocking our Heavenly Father. In other areas, our founding documents are usually ignored, or taken to mean something entirely different than intended. This world frequently makes no sense. But we are called to trust God, and pray for our nation and those in authority. For the next month, as we celebrate our freedoms, will you join me in praying for America, your community, and our national and local leaders?

Daily, for the next month, I will post a verse and short prayer to guide us as we pray for The United States of America and our leaders.

2 Chronicles 7:14

“If my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.”

 

images: google images

Scripture: English Standard Version

 

 

Why July 2 is really America’s Independence Day


declaration-of-independence-and-a-feather

Because it was on July 2, 1776, that the Second Continental Congress meeting in Philadelphia voted to approve a resolution for independence from Britain.

On that same day, the Pennsylvania Evening Post published this: “This day the Continental Congress declared the United Colonies Free and Independent States.”

So why do we celebrate July 4th as Independence Day?

We do because of a little thing called the Declaration of Independence.

The document was adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4th. The first draft of the declaration was written by Thomas Jefferson, who gave it to John Adams and Benjamin Franklin for editing. (You can read about it at the National Archives Web site.) Jefferson then took their version, refined it further and presented it to the Congress.

Scholars don’t even think the document was signed by delegates of the Continental Congress on July 4th.

The huge canvas painting by John Trumbull hanging in the grand Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol depicting the signing of the Declaration is, it turns out, a work of imagination. In his biography of John Adams, historian David McCullough wrote: “No such scene, with all the delegates present, ever occurred at Philadelphia.”

It is now believed that most of the delegates signed it on Aug. 2. That’s when the assistant to the secretary of Congress, Timothy Matlack, produced a clean copy.

John Hancock, who was the president of the Continental Congress, signed first, right in the middle of the area for signatures. The last delegate to sign, according to the National Archives, is believed to be Thomas McKean of Delaware, some time in 1777.

The city of Philadelphia, where the Declaration was signed, waited until July 8 to celebrate, with a parade and the firing of guns. The Continental Army under the leadership of George Washington didn’t learn about it until July 9.

As for the British government in London, well, it didn’t know that the United States had declared independence until Aug. 30.

By Valerie Strauss

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/post/why-july-2-is-really-americas-independence-day/2012/07/02/gJQABsMHIW_blog.html