Change


 change

“The Only Thing That Is Constant Is Change” – Heraclitus

Ecclesiastes 3:1

For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven:

A big change happened in my life this past week. I had been praying for months for a resolution to a certain situation. Suddenly that problem was resolved. There was no hint the change was coming, it just happened. Now I am faced with new circumstances and new challenges. The question before me is how to approach those new circumstances and challenges in a way that honors God.

The answer is quite simple, it’s just humans have a tendency to overcomplicate things. We need to remember that everything God does for us is motivated by His great love for us. Knowing this, it’s critical to seek God’s direction when faced with great change. We may be tempted to face new circumstances the same way we faced old challenges, but new circumstances require an in-depth conversation with God, asking Him what we are to do in this new situation.

For me, taking a long walk with God will provide some guidance. I also need to delve into the Scriptures, asking our Lord for direction in this new season of life. Remember, the approach we have taken to old circumstances may not be the way to handle new things. We are creatures of habit and like that which is familiar, but God may be calling us out of our comfort zone. Be open to the new, and experience something new.

While change may be constant, it’s important to remember our God doesn’t change (Hebrews 13:8). His every action is based on His great love for us. Therefore, we can face every change knowing it is from God.

Blessings on your day.

Scripture: www.openbible.info

Image: google images

The Day that Death Died


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Two thousand years ago the greatest event in all of history occurred. Christ paid the highest ransom of all and defeated the biggest foe of all  – death. This was an act of pure grace, and was the best gift ever given. But the miracle of Easter is that His grace is a gift that grows bigger when we share it.

2 Timothy 1:9-10 NIV

He has saved us and called us to a holy life—not because of anything we have done but because of his own purpose and grace. This grace was given us in Christ Jesus before the beginning of time, but it has now been revealed through the appearing of our Savior, Christ Jesus, who has destroyed death and has brought life and immortality to light through the gospel.

Dear Heavenly Father,

We are overcome with your love, so great, that you would make a way for redemption. We praise you and thank you for Easter – the promise of eternal life, with You. Guide our hearts to be fully yours. Let us see the world from your perspective. Speak through our lips so we may share your story. Work through our hands and feet that we may share Your grace with the world. Amen.

Jesus our King!


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“Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout, daughter of Jerusalem! See, your king comes to you; righteous and having salvation, gentle and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.” – Zechariah 9:9

As we enter Holy Week, may you experience the power, grace, and humility of our precious Savior.

Heart Lag and Pop-Tarts


Today, I am blessed to have a guest post from my friend, and Director of Missions, at the church I attend. Recently, Teresa led a mission team to Rwanda. This is what she sent to the other travelers upon their return.

 On Returning

By Teresa Sherwood

To Returning Mission Teams:

I’m sure a lot of people have asked you this week if you have jet lag, but has anyone asked you if you are suffering from heart lag? I know for myself, returning from these kinds of mission trips can bring on a few days (or maybe more than a few) of feeling somehow disconnected, as though I don’t quite belong here. Several years ago, I encountered this feeling in a profound way and, in sorting through it, I discovered that it was not only a matter of the heart but a very real spiritual challenge.

It was the year of our first high school mission trip to Mexico. We had spent the week working at an orphanage where the conditions for the children were really deplorable. When we left, we knew that we had only scratched the surface of meeting the needs of these little kids who had laughed and played with us all week. On the last day, we were honored with a fellowship time that included LOTS of songs and prayers and, as a very special treat, we were served Coke and Pop-Tarts. Little 4-year-olds came around and served each of us, making sure we had all eaten before they did. We all understood the value of their gift and we were humbled by it.

I arrived back home last Saturday night and by Monday morning I was on a flight to Vancouver. There, I met up with my husband, Donnie, who had been attending a meeting. Then we embarked on an Alaskan cruise. As I sat at a table overflowing with food, looked out at the beautiful, cool mountains, and made small talk with the well-dressed new friends at my table, I was overcome by the memory of the little faces for which my simple presence had been a blessing. I thought of the children who never had enough to eat, who slept in sweltering dorms, and who lacked clean water. I felt their presence at the table and, rather than anticipating the beautiful five-course meal, I realized that I was thinking of Pop-Tarts. I found myself asking my God why we lived in a world where some had not enough and others had too much. And why was I one who had too much? I looked at the other people at the table and realized that they didn’t feel the presence of these children, and they probably didn’t know how valuable Pop-Tarts can be. I realized at that moment that I had left a part of myself in an orphanage in Mexico and it had been replaced with an abiding sense of the spirit of God’s children.

A few years ago, I left a part of myself in Africa, under a tree. I gave myself away to a little girl in a yellow dress and she gave me a piece of herself that will always be with me. In that moment, I found once again how truly real the love of Jesus Christ is as it passes among His children.

I have never been able to answer the question of why some have not enough while others have too much, but I have found that God is completely present in both want and plenty. I do not believe that God would have us neglect the beauty He has created or fail to enjoy the goodness of the world. But I do believe that He calls us to put it in perspective, to understand that we neither need nor deserve such gifts. We simply thank God for them and then give.

If you are finding that you struggle this week with difficult feelings, I pray that you will explore them, pray about them, and offer them to God. He is probably making a place in your heart for something new, a blessing that will expand your territory.

Thank you for sharing yourselves. You are a blessing.

 “Feed the hungry! Help those in trouble! Then your light will shine out from the darkness and the darkness shall be as bright as day.”  Isaiah 58:10

 I don’t know about you, but I will never look at a Pop-Tart the same way again. 

Blessings on your day.

A Life Verse


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 Deuteronomy 11:18 (CEV)

Memorize these laws and think about them. Write down copies and tie them to your wrists and your foreheads to help you obey them.

I have heard Pastors and other Christian leaders talk about finding a “life verse.” A life verse is more than a favorite verse; it is the verse that speaks directly to you in a remarkably personal way. With more than 31,000 verses in the Bible the task seemed overwhelming to me, so I put it off. I wondered how one verse could speak to my life now, and ten years from now.

Still, it’s a concept I wanted to explore further. Over time, I read articles and blog posts from various Christian authors. There was no shortage of advice, but still, I couldn’t pick one verse. As I reflected on what verse to select I thought I should pick a verse that I could quote while sharing the gospel, and to give myself encouragement. I googled “Top Memory Verses” and read over 100 suggested verses. Several would have worked as a life verse, but I was not drawn to any one particular verse. There were also personal struggles going on in my life, which made the decision more difficult.

It wasn’t until I set out to read the entire Bible that I found my life verse, tucked away in the book of a minor prophet – Zephaniah. Part of Zephaniah, chapter 3, discusses the blessing of restoration for God’s people. It also points to Christ’s millennial kingdom. As a young adult I ignored the Lord. Although I regret my foolishness, this verse reminds me of God’s great love and forgiveness, and His ability to make great change in anyone’s life, even after disobedience. It also points to a future of hope.

Zephaniah 3:17 (GNT)

The Lord your God is with you; his power gives you victory. The Lord will take delight in you, and in his love he will give you new life. He will sing and be joyful over you.”

What’s your life verse? If you don’t have one I encourage you to find a verse that speaks to you so personally, you find it a special treasure.

Blessings on your day.

 

Image: Google Images

The Legacy of Saint Patrick


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Today millions of people will celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with good luck wishes, parades and merriment. However, St. Patrick’s legacy has nothing to do with superstition and merry making. God used St. Patrick to bring the Gospel to a pagan culture. His legacy still endures.

Ireland was a beautiful island, but the people were in darkness. Druids ruled the land. Around 400 A.D., Patrick was abducted from his homeland and put on a slave ship bound for Ireland. He spent six years tending flocks for the Chieftain he was sold to.

Eventually, Patrick escaped and returned to his home and family. His faith was strengthened and he began to study for the ministry. In a vision, God called Patrick to be a missionary to Ireland. Patrick returned to the people who enslaved him as a boy.

At that time the people of Ireland worshiped multiple gods of the sky and the earth and the water. Patrick’s first task was to convince the Irish that there was only one God and that his God really did love them. Patrick was familiar with the Irish language and culture from his years in captivity, so he chose to incorporate Irish ritual and symbols into his teaching. Patrick added the sun (a powerful Irish symbol) to the cross, creating the  Celtic cross so that the result would seem more natural to the people.

In 432 A.D., Patrick built a church on the site of the present day St. Patrick’s Memorial Church in Saul — the first ever Christian church in all of Ireland. It’s considered the cradle of Irish Christianity.

Legend has it that Patrick used the shamrock to explain the Holy Trinity – the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

Patrick’s ministry lasted 29 years. He baptized over 120,000 Irishmen and planted 300 churches. He died on March 17, 461 AD. His legacy has endured 1600 years!

One of my most treasured possessions is my great-grandmother’s Bible. It is one of the few possessions she had when she left Ireland and traveled by ship to America in 1898. With a broken spine and tattered pages, the Bible really is falling apart. But it represents the hopes, dreams, and courage God gave her to build a life in this new land for future generations. It also represents the faith she passed on to her eleven children. She went to heaven in 1950, but not before she left a godly legacy that continues with me. My spiritual legacy is also to pass my faith to my children and grand children.

How can you impact future generations?

Deuteronomy 6:5-7

“You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might. And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise.”

Data on St. Patrick gathered from: http://www.cbn.com/spirituallife/churchandministry/churchhistory/patricius_the_true_story_of_st_patrick.aspx, retrieved on March 11,2015.

 

Scripture: http://www.openbible.info

Image: Google Images

Fresh Bread


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“Then Jesus declared, ‘I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.’” John 6:35

The aroma of warm bread just out of the oven is enticing. People love the smell and look forward to savoring freshly-baked breads. To experience its full flavor, bread should be eaten soon after it is baked. Stale bread, bread that has sat for a few days, is unappealing and usually tossed in the trash. That’s why bakeries and restaurants bake their breads throughout the day – everyday.

To keep our faith fresh and appealing to others, we must constantly feast on the words of Jesus Christ, the bread of life. That’s not always easy to do. Our lives are busier than ever. Finding a few minutes alone with our Lord is difficult, but so rewarding. Tasting and savoring a bit of Scripture every day nourishes us spiritually.

One thing I have noticed about devotionals is that each day’s reading focuses on just a few verses, and a short narrative. The Bible is so alive and relevant that we can read just one or two verses and be spiritually nourished for the day. It’s amazing to me how these few verses each day speak to my spirit.

We don’t eat just once or twice a week. Instead, we enjoy regular meals to maintain our strength. Our spiritual health depends on receiving regular nourishment too.

 Rather, he delights in the teachings of the Lord and reflects on his teachings day and night.” Psalm 1:2 (GW)

 

Blessings on your day.

 

Scripture: www.biblegateway.com

Image: Google Images